Expectation

So begins my usual rant about the how scary/terrifying/awesome it is to shoot and develop a roll of film. And all of these emotions are very real during this process and not an exaggeration at all (for the most part). I definitely am sitting around for days waiting anxiously for the roll to be developed hoping that I didn’t mess something up. So what causes this storm of emotions besides the usual feelings of working on something without knowing the full outcome. 

I think the anxiety comes from expectation. I expect the images to all turn out. I expect the images to look like they do on Instagram. I am so tempted at the end of the film process to color correct the images because I don’t trust the process to create something beautiful, to not let the film be imperfect, to not meet my expectations. But this need for control can lead to a lot of disappointment because sometimes it is out of my reach. And often the lack of control is a good thing, because I am pleasantly surprised with the results. What if I didn’t have expectations? Not that I didn’t work with goals in mind or with a set processes, but that I am content with the work that is produced, flaws and all. This is something I want to be better at, leaving expectations at the door and letting the process inform the creative work.

Enjoy these lovely film images shot on Kodak Ultramax. Naomi was a lovely model as we explored the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, a place I hope to return to soon.

 
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Community

I'm going to be honest and say that the thought of being social with a group of photographers on a cold windy day was not how I wanted to spend my last Saturday. But as usual, I didn't regret the time spent with other creators at all. It's usually fun to work alone, taking the time to try out my own ideas uninterrupted. But that's not a good attitude to have at all. There is always something extra special that occurs during collaboration. These magical moments of creativity come from different perspectives and visions colliding into something beautiful and new. These organic creations couldn't and wouldn't have occurred any other way. I'm very grateful to the creative community here in Boston to continues to engage and inspire.

 

 
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Process

As a lover of film photography I struggle to enjoy the entire process that is shooting on film. There are so many variables involved that little mistakes add up quickly and potentially wreck the roll (this is every film photographer’s worst nightmare).  

Despite the struggle and accidents, the final images are always worth it. I’m grateful that my photography education started in the darkroom and I hold those learned skills close. Still, it’s kind of big deal when I get the roll back and all the shots turn out. It feels good. Like shout out loud at the film processing technician good.

But I strive for this success to become a regular occurrence and not a pleasant surprise. I know practice makes perfect and so I continue to hone these skills. Here are a few from my latest shoot with some lovely Kodak Tri-X.

 
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Micaéla

It’s a common misconception that a photographer’s job is some posing and framing but mostly just clicking the button of the camera. Yet that really doesn’t include all the pre and post-work involved in shooting. There is location scouting (Boston you make this so hard) and planning to be done and then editing and sharing on the tail end. The creative process has a lot of practical aspects to it that can’t be ignored. Of course all the hard work is worth it each and every time. It makes you appreciate the end result ever more.

Thanks to Micaéla for being apart of the creative process. I appreciate your ideas and collaboration. Come back to Boston soon!

 
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Lindsey + Braden

Winter weddings are by definition a little more challenging but that was hardly the case for Lindsey and Braden’s wedding. Sure, it was absolutely the coldest day of the year outside but that didn’t stop anyone from having a great time. The sun filled church served as the perfect warm oasis.

Surrounded by family and friends, Lindsey and Braden’s intimate wedding was the perfect way to spend in afternoon. The low-key atmosphere of the day was the perfect fit for the happy couple. The clear skies allowed for striking beams of light to come through the various windows. We chased the light around the building using the shapes and frames to highlight the newlyweds. 

Congrats you two!

 
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